Abstract

The current research focuses on the risk factors for bully profiles, antisocial behavior across profiles, and patterns of bullying behavior over the span of four school years. The sample was comprised of 1,817 middle school students from seven school districts. Latent profile analysis, multivariate regression techniques, and latent transition analysis were used to meet the five objectives of this study: 1) identify unique subgroups of youth based on responses to different bully experiences, 2) determine similarities and differences in risk factors that are associated with bully experiences, 3) examine antisocial behavior across identified bully profiles, 4) determine if membership in bully profiles is stable or changes over time, and 5) assess the similarities and differences in the risk factors associated with transition patterns over four time points. Results indicated that unique subgroups of youth exist based on bully perpetration and bully victimization experiences. Similarities and differences arose in the risk factors that were associated with bully experiences and transition patterns. However, across the identified bully profiles, antisocial behavior did not vary once time order was established. These results have important implications for research, practice, and policy, which are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Fisher, Kristina Childs

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

Criminal Justice

Degree Program

Criminal Justice

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008134

Language

English

Release Date

August 2023

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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