Abstract

Advances in information technology services have seen profound impacts on the state of transport services in the urban traffic environment. Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) represents the digital consolidation of users, operators, and public-private managing entities to provide totally comprehensive, integrated trip-making services. Users now enjoy extra flexibility for trip-making with new modal alternatives such as micro-mobility (e.g Lime Bikes, Spin Scooters) and rideshare (e.g. Lyft, Uber). However, current knowledge on the performance and interactive effects of these newer alternative modes is vague if not inconsistent. As such, these effects were studied through micro-simulation analysis of a multi-modal urban corridor in Orlando, Florida. D-Optimal experimental designs are generated to evaluate the hard performance and sustainability effects of five (5) modes: personal vehicles, bus transit, rideshare, walking, and micro-mobility. Bus transit demonstrates the lowest impact per person-trip on a route-level (i.e. travel time, queuing), while significantly enhancing network-level performance factors such as average delay and travel speed. For instance, a relatively minor eight (8) percent increase in transit share resulted in a 15.5 percent decrease in average delay through the network. Moreover, the route-level impacts of transit decrease to zero as the network approaches congestion. Conversely, rideshare demonstrates significant adverse effects across all performance measures, worsening in more congested conditions, while walking and micro-mobility effects are found to vary and are dictated mainly by their interactions with other sidewalk and roadway users. Furthermore, curbside facilities such as lay-bys also demonstrated substantial roadway performance impacts. Lastly, various cost analyses are used to demonstrate the potential cost-efficiency of even the most cutting-edge transit-focused services in terms of project budgeting and externalities. Discussion of the findings provided valuable insights for street-and-city-level multi-modal planning design, as well as the broader operational implications of autonomous technologies taking on a greater role in the transportation service industry.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Abou-Senna, Hatem

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering

Degree Program

Civil Engineering; Transportation System Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008157; DP0023499

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0023499

Language

English

Release Date

August 2020

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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