Abstract

This work is designed to address the questions as to what drives and collapses trust between a human and a robot. Such information is needed to properly design automated decision aids. Human-robot trust (HRT) has traditionally been measured by questionnaires, which can be subject to lack of participant understanding, disengagement, and dishonesty. Therefore, implicit measures of trust are needed to measure HRT. The goal here is to identify neuro-physiological underpinnings (implicit measures) for HRT to assist designers in the development of automated robotic aids. More specifically, experiment one, looked to determine the effects of witnessing robot error on skin conductance response (SCR) and heart rate variability (HrV). The second experiment complemented this first procedure by determining the effects of witnessing robot error on Event Related Potentials (ERPs). Each experiment employed situations which previously have been empirically demonstrated to elicit a trust change in human participants. Both studies included two different robot reliability rates in a within subject design. Reliability consisted of each robot identifying civilians at either 95% reliability or 75% reliability. Self-reported dependent measures were perceptional robot reliability, trust questionnaires, a stress measure and a cognitive workload measure. Neurological and physiological dependent variables included SC, HrV, and ERPs. Heart rate variability did not demonstrate any evident changes based on robot reliability. In addition, SC demonstrated mixed changes based on robot reliability. However, ERP measures showed predictable changes based on robot reliability. None of the measures significantly correlated to changes in trust.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Hancock, Peter

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Human Factors Cognitive Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008188; DP0023542

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0023542

Language

English

Release Date

August 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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