Abstract

In order for democracies to survive, citizens need to be knowledgeable, active members of society. Schools in the United States, more importantly teachers, are often tasked with the responsibility to pass on the knowledge and skills to future generations. The purpose of this research study was to examine and describe how civics teachers' personal experiences, perceptions and ideas influence their pedagogical approaches. While past research has examined the attitudes and dispositions of students, as well as self-report measures of what teachers indicate they are doing in their classroom, no studies have actually observed civics teachers' pedagogical approaches. Five participants were selected to participate in interviews and observations. Lesson plans and student work samples were also collected to supplement the findings of the interviews and observations. Based on the outcome of the analysis, it was determined that the participants implemented their perception of the purpose of civics education, their perception of democratic education and their idea of a good citizen in their instructional practices.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Russell, William

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

School of Teacher Education

Degree Program

Education; Social Science Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008240; DP0023594

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0023594

Language

English

Release Date

August 2020

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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