Abstract

This descriptive study examined turnover intention for wait staff working at independent and regional chain restaurants in central Florida. The purpose of this dissertation in practice was to understand the role that stress, Person-Environment Fit, and demographics play in turnover intention. A self-report questionnaire was distributed to wait staff in central Florida via social media websites. The self-report questionnaire consisted of the Perceived Person-Environment Fit Scale (PPEFS), the General Workplace Stress Scale (GWSS), and the Turnover Intention Scale (TIS-6). A total of 265 responses were collected from participants and the responses were analyzed using a stepwise regression and two multilinear regressions. The analysis of the data revealed that stress and Person-Supervisor Fit were the two strongest predictors of turnover intention. The data revealed that demographics, particularly age and gender, did not influence turnover intention. This study provides unique insights on the central Florida restaurant industry, particularly when examining how stress and Person-Environment Fit influence turnover intention. The findings of this study indicate a need for further investigation on how to decrease stress and improve employee-manager relationships for servers at central Florida restaurants.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Gill, Michele

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

Learning Sciences and Educational Research

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008349; DP0023786

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0023786

Language

English

Release Date

December 2023

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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