Abstract

As the size scale of electrical devices approach the atomic scale. Moore's law is predicted to be over for semiconductor devices. Studies into the replacement of semiconductor technology with organic devices was first predicted by Avriam and Ratner[1] in 1974. Since then significant research into molecular based organic devices has been conducted. The work presented in this dissertation explores the theoretical frameworks used to model transport through molecular junctions. We present studies which seek to garner a better understanding of the charge transport through molecular junctions and how the conduction properties can be optimized. We show that a single atom can change a molecule from an insulator to a conductor. We also study the effects of sigma and pi bridges on molecular rectification. We will then show molecular devices that act as viable electrical static and dynamic switches. The studies presented here help to demonstrate the viability of organic devices in the forms of rectifiers and switches with applications ranging from the replacement of traditional semiconductor devices to neuromorphic computing.

Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Del Barco, Enrique

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008358

Language

English

Release Date

December 2020

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Physics Commons

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