Abstract

Dystopian literature allows for there to be an avenue, or safety net as I would call it, for people to be able to discuss topics of a harsh nature. Students or young adults today are becoming increasingly more apolitical upon completion of high school. This is due in part to the lack of information or knowledge given to them prior to entering, "the real world." The gravity of situations occurring in today's world during the time of this paper such as the how similar living with COVID-19 is to a dystopian society, or the Black Lives Matter movement, it is vital that young adults know who to turn to, that way they can figure out what is happening within the world. Utilizing dystopian literature within the classroom setting will allow for that avenue each year and create an extra safe space for students to be able to discuss their thoughts on societal issues such as power and individualism. By doing so, teachers will be able to better gauge a student's comprehension of these themes regarding real life. As much as we say it, the youth truly are the future; they are the ones who will determine the direction that our society will move. Teaching them to think metacognitively not only with content specific skills, but also with real world issues that society faces will benefit them, and society down the road.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Olan, Elsie

Degree

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

College

College of Community Innovation and Education

Department

School of Teacher Education

Degree Program

Secondary Education; English Language Arts Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008400; DP0023837

Language

English

Release Date

December 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

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