Abstract

Preterm birth in the United States is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. The United States spends more per capita on healthcare than any other nation in the world, and still perinatal outcomes are disappointing when compared to other industrialized nations. Research and current clinical practice guidelines support the use of early and consistent prenatal care to lower risks for preterm birth, by acting as a key mechanism to monitor pregnancy and provide timely and appropriate interventions. Significant research has been completed to identify causative factors that lead to preterm birth. Overall, this literature has not had a substantial impact on decreasing preterm birth rates in the United States. Access to healthcare is one modifiable factor that can be influenced by policy change and potentially have a positive impact on lowering preterm birth rates. This dissertation examines geographical access to prenatal care services in Florida and its influence on preterm birth rates. The researchers used quantitative methods coupled with Geographic Information Systems to evaluate the relationship between potential access to prenatal care and preterm birth rates.

Graduation Date

2020

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Neff, Donna

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Nursing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008402

Language

English

Release Date

November 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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