Abstract

This thesis examines the internationalization of the Ogaden War of 1977 to 1978 between Ethiopia and Somalia. It argues that the involvement of the superpowers--the United States and the Soviet Union-- exacerbated the regional conflict. Somalia, a country that was fractured because of the Scramble for Africa, was driven by the concept of Greater Somalia, the unification of all ethnic Somali lands. Ethiopia, a country that fought fiercely to resist colonization, resisted by any means necessary to secure their sovereignty over the Ogaden. The conflict was complicated due to the overwhelming amount of military aid Ethiopia received from the Soviet Union during the period of detente and the United States' newfound refusal to get involved in African conflict. By looking at the history of the conflict and the conflicting Somalian nationalism and Ethiopian authoritarianism, this thesis will show how the conflict became inevitable and led to the destabilization of Somalia through civil war.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu.

Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Walker, Ezekiel

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

History

Degree Program

History

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008476

Language

English

Release Date

May 2024

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

Share

COinS