Abstract

My experiences with healthcare providers, which pervade my earliest childhood memories, motivated me to become autonomous in managing my health and wellness. This autoethnographic research explores the literacy activities embedded in everyday lived experiences that informed the process of lamination in composing health literacy which influenced health practices and outcomes. By tracing textual trajectories and examining the process of chronotopic lamination to compose my health literacy across everyday literacy activities this autoethnographic thesis project highlights how nonmedically trained persons can use official and nonofficial sources to create a social and culturally contextualized health literacy. This research calls for recognition of the agency that instills confidence in the patient-author regarding their own health and wellness and positions them in authority as the expert of their own embodied experiences. The implications of this research point towards suggestions for the systems that influence health literacy in order to recognize the autonomous agency of patients.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Roozen, Kevin

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Writing and Rhetoric

Degree Program

English; Rhetoric and Composition

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008523

Language

English

Release Date

May 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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