Abstract

Propulsion systems are influenced by the efficiency of combustion systems. One approach to substantially improve combustion efficiency is through pressure gain combustion or detonation-based engines. Detonations exhibit attractive features such as increased stagnation pressure and rapid heat release; however, their highly unsteady and three-dimensional nature makes them difficult to characterize. In addition, the deflagration state prior to detonation is not well defined experimentally. Detonations can be achieved via the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT), where a deflagration that propagates on the order of 1 – 10 m/s is accelerated to a detonation that propagates on the order of 2000 m/s. The DDT process is highly dynamic and can occur through several mechanisms such as the Zeldovich reactivity-gradient mechanism where hot spots are created by Mach stem reflections, localized vorticial explosions, boundary layer effects, or turbulence. This work focuses on transient compressible flame regimes within the turbulent DDT (tDDT) process which causes a flame to undergo various burning modes. These burning modes can be categorized into four regimes: (1) slow deflagrations, (2) fast deflagrations, (3) shock-flame complex, and (4) detonation. To achieve each burning mode, turbulence levels and propagation velocities are tailored using perforated plates and various fuel-oxidizer compositions. The primary goal of this dissertation is to characterize the relationship between the turbulent flame speed (ST) and Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) deflagration speed (SCJ) using high-speed optical diagnostics in a turbulent shock tube facility. This work will: (1) further validate and classify the turbulence-compressibility characteristics associated with fast flames that lead to detonation onset in a highly turbulent environment, (2) quantify local ST for fast flames, and (3) investigate the flow field conditions of flame modes relating to the SCJ criteria, from slow deflagrations to shock-flame complexes.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Ahmed, Kareem

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Aerospace Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008636;DP0025367

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025367

Language

English

Release Date

August 2024

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

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