Abstract

As group- and team-based employment structures increase in popularity, it is important to understand the factors that promote or inhibit the transfer of knowledge or information between employees. Given that knowledge transfer processes often occur as a result of requests for knowledge or information from information targets by information seekers, this dissertation focused on a specific form of information-seeking behaviors – coworker nosiness – and the process through which perceptions of coworker nosiness result in knowledge sharing and knowledge hiding behaviors. Perceived coworker nosiness refers to behaviors judged by information targets as high-frequency information-seeking behaviors that are meant to gather information that is overly personal in nature and/or irrelevant to information seekers' abilities to carry out their jobs effectively. Although affective trust was hypothesized to mediate relationships between coworker nosiness and both knowledge sharing and knowledge hiding, results across two studies – one using an experimental methodology and the other using a time-lagged survey design – found that higher levels of cognitive trust felt toward information targets rather than affective trust resulted in more knowledge sharing and less knowledge hiding. Additional analyses were conducted to consider alternative explanations and examine relationships with other relevant constructs. Discussions of the strengths and limitations of both studies as well as the practical implications and future research directions are provided.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Ehrhart, Mark

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008641;DP0025372

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025372

Language

English

Release Date

8-15-2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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