Abstract

Alcohol use contributes to widespread harm in college students, and postponing initiation of drinking can reduce negative consequences and risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (Palmer et al., 2010). This study focused on variables related to initiation of alcohol use among new students, and maintenance of abstinence among those who chose not to drink. Data was collected from 467 first year college students, 7.5% of whom initiated alcohol use in college, 33% had never consumed alcohol, and 59.5% started drinking before starting college. Several a- priori hypotheses were supported. Perceptions of peer drinking/attitudes mediated the relationship between academic involvement and alcohol initiation, and social integration and alcohol initiation. Social anxiety was mediated by expectancies and moderated by need to belong, however, perceived peer drinking/attitudes was not a significant moderator. The influence of personality was mediated by expectancies, perceptions of peer drinking/attitudes, and safety perceptions as hypothesized. Overall, these results shed light on the process of initiation of alcohol use and have the potential to inform development of effective prevention strategies.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Dunn, Michael

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Clinical Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008699;DP0025430

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025430

Language

English

Release Date

August 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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