Abstract

Actors are frequently required to be emotionally available on the spot, in situations ranging from an early morning acting class, to filming a scene well past midnight after a full day on set. In theatre, there is the expectation to deliver the right emotion every performance, and in film, when the camera and crew are ready, the actor is expected to produce the emotion at that moment. This demand to give emotionally compelling performances can cause an actor to stress under the pressure to deliver. Acting for stage and film have similarities and differences, and an actor needs to learn how to adjust for the emotional nuances of each. This thesis explores an actresses' practice-as-research experience with emotional availability on various films (independent and student feature, short, and industrial films), and an outdoor amphitheater production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. The techniques used, and each situation's circumstances, are analyzed to find what helped or hindered access to emotional availability. With what is learned from this practice-as-research, the actress decides the next steps in her journey to increase her emotional availability.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2021

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Niess, Christopher

Degree

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Theatre

Degree Program

Theatre; Acting Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0008708;DP0025439

URL

https://purls.library.ucf.edu/go/DP0025439

Language

English

Release Date

August 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Acting Commons

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