Title

Instability in presidential and parliamentary systems : the cases of Costa Rica and Pakistan

Abstract

Current Political Science literature tends to heavily favor Parliamentary systems for newly democratizing countries. Most Political Scientists argue that Presidential systems are inherently unstable and are unable to effectively deal with major political and economic problems that arise in government. It has been argued that unlike Parliamentary systems, Presidential systems', in-built rigidities leave few viable mechanisms to resolve crises that arise in government. This lack of flexibility then leads to political instability, and eventually democratic breakdown. In my thesis I dispute this argument using two countries, one Presidential(Costa Rica), and one Parliamentary(Pakistan). I argue that it is not Presidential systems per se that cause political instability, rather there are other factors, all together-independent of regime type, that are the cause of unstable governments. I will also show that Parliamentary systems might themselves be incapable of resolving economic and political crises, while conversely, some Presidential regimes have proven to be very successful with little political instability and considerable levels of ·economic and social development.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

Thesis Completion

1999

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Wilson, Bruce M.

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Political Science

Subjects

Arts and Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic;Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Sciences;Costa Rica -- Politics and government;Democracy;Pakistan -- Politics and government

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0021569

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS