Title

The Effects of Occupational Title and Language Choice on Consumer's Acceptance of Behavior Analysis

Abstract

Behavior Analysis is a relatively young discipline in psychology with its roots in Skinner's (1938) early research involving the experimental analysis of behavior. Since the first certification of Behavior Analysts in 1979, the field has grown in popularity as a plausible treatment for many maladaptive behaviors. Certified Behavior Analysts are trained to approach each situation with many scientific facts and terms. This study examined the effects of the occupational title "behavior analyst" and the use of scientific behavioral jargon on the perception of the mental health professionals. Participants included 116 students attending community college. Participants read different vignettes manipulating occupational title and language choice. The Interpersonal Adjective Scale (IAS) and Barrett-Lennard's Relationship Inventory were used to measure the perception of the mental health professional in the vignettes. The results of this study indicated no major differences. Implications are discussed.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

Thesis Completion

2004

Semester

Fall

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Subjects

Arts and Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic; Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Sciences; Behaviorism (Psychology); Psychology

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0021819

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS