Title

The paradox of U.S. foreign policy towards revolutionary states

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Realism is considered one of the most prominent schools of thought for foreign policy strategies. Realism focuses on the notion of self-interest that often gives a sense of security that earns the favor with many U.S. policymakers and ordinary people as well.

This style of foreign policy has often required the United States to intervene in the affairs of developing nations in order to protect its assets. Now many of those nations, destabilized by U.S. intervention, are causing serious issues on the world stage. Some of modern history's most notorious revolutions have spurred out of years of foreign intervention. The Cuban Revolution of 1959, and the 1979 revolutions in both Iran and Nicaragua are the direct result of U.S. intervention. The United States has never had a clear foreign policy except to protect itself from perceived threats to national security. Although this may seem like a simple, safe strategy it seems that every conflict ends in the same confusion surrounding the actual objective of the United States government.

The solution is a new look at the effectiveness of realist based interventionism. It can be argued that rather than focusing on failed realist strategy, actual promotion of liberalism and protection of human rights, will eventually result in greater economic and political gain for the United States.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2009

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Sadri, Houman A.

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Degree Program

Political Science

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences;Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0022348

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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