Title

The effect of parent education on maternal self-efficacy and preference for pain control during labor

Keywords

Analgesia; Childbirth -- Study and teaching; Pain -- Treatment

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of parent education on maternal confidence and predictions of pain medication use in labor. The variables in this study were maternal age, parity, self-efficacy, prediction of pain medication usage, and parent education attendance. A convenience sample of I 00 pregnant women enrolled in parent education classes at a major metropolitan tertiary care system was used. Data were collected through surveys administered by parent educators prior to the first class in the series and at the end of the last class. Instruments included the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory and a questionnaire regarding maternal preference for pain control during tabor. The findings indicated that the parent education classes had a positive effect on the women's childbirth self-efficacy and outcome expectancy. Additionally, at the end of the classes a significant number of women reported they were less certain that they would have an epidural or use narcotic pain medication during labor. The findings, however, demonstrated no significant difference among the CBSEI scores of women with different preferences for pain control during labor.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2003

Advisor

Kiehl, Ermalynn

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Nursing

Format

Print

Pages

68 p.

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022672

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Health and Public Affairs; Health and Public Affairs -- Dissertations, Academic

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