Title

A protocol for acquisition of medicinal supplies for health care missions serving third world populations

Keywords

Medical supplies -- Developing countries, Missions, Medical -- Developing countries

Abstract

Humanitarian medical aid to third world countries requires extensive planning and· coordination. Much of the needed aid received by these populations is from medical mission teams originating. in industrialized countries. These groups supply medical treatment and aid to under served populations, usually during brief trips. to the country of need. Pharmaceutical and medical supply acquisition is necessary for these missions, but requires careful _selection. Lack of knowledge regarding the needs of the population to be visited may lead to poor choices. Knowledge of the limited resources available in third world countries may lead to the misconception that any drug offered is better than no _treatment. This attitude can lead to poor donation practices that may result in greater hardships for the country one is trying to assist. The purpose of this project was to develop a protocol, derived from experience and review of current research that can be used for acquisition of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies. This resource describes steps and considerations necessary when choosing medicinal supplies, including a list of large pharmaceutical outlets that warehouse drugs for this purpose.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

Graduation Date

1999

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Holcomb, Lygia

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Family Nurse Practitioner

Format

Print

Pages

126 p.

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022666

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Health and Public Affairs; Health and Public Affairs -- Dissertations, Academic

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