Title

Health care professionals attitudes and behaviors toward breast-feeding

Abstract

Breast-feeding is widely recognized as the optimal way of nurturing infants while simultaneously benefiting the lactating mother. This research project examined studies published in United States on the attitudes and behaviors of health care professionals toward breast-feeding and the subsequent lactation experiences.

Health care professionals can promote a successful breast-feeding experience by providing support, guidance, and information. A review of the literature indicated that most health care professionals support the idea of breast-feeding, and actively recommend and promote its benefits. However, the attitudes, personal biases, and behaviors of the health care professionals frequently hindered the breast-feeding experiences of new mothers. Nurses perceived breast-feeding support as too time-consuming. Mothers were looking for support, and were often discouraged by conflicting advice, and the lack of genuine support in their breast-feeding efforts. The review also indicated that residency training does not adequately prepare physicians and residents for breast-feeding promotion and management. Often the physician assumes that somebody else will take care of breast-feeding management.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

No public access per Nursing

Graduation Date

1998

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Kiehl, Ermalynn

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Nursing

Format

Print

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0023875

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Health and Public Affairs; Health and Public Affairs -- Dissertations, Academic

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