Abstract

A passive oculometer is a device that measures the position of the eye by utilizing the corneo-retinal potential (CRP) generated by the eye. In this thesis, the Bandpass Oculometer replaces the joystick of a personal computer, allowing the viewer to use a computer simply by moving his eyes. Low frequency noise, present in all electronic circuits, produces an offset from the reference point, the center of the screen. In previous lowpass oculometry studies at University of Central Florida, this offset caused the cursor to drift toward the edge of the field of view within a period of 30 seconds, decreasing the ability to precisely control the cursor on the monitor. The Bandpass Oculometer is different from its predecessors in that bandpass filtering is utilized. By filtering all frequencies except where eye movement occurs, low frequency drift noise and higher frequency interference signals are eliminated. Consequently, the viewer can achieve a reference with no offset and no drift, resulting in smoother tracking and better control of the computer. An additional improvement to previous oculometers is the new computer interface. A diode shaping network is used to simulate a joystick resistance, and an optocoupler relays the output current to the computer. The optocoupler electrically isolates the viewer from the computer, thus making the system safer to use.

Graduation Date

1988

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Martin, Robert J.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Department

Electrical Engineering and Communication Sciences

Format

PDF

Pages

68 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022053

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering; Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic

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