Abstract

Ihis thesis describes an innovative technique for detennining the impulse response of a SAW device including the effects of diffraction on both isotropic and anisotropic substrates. The approach presented is unique in that it determines the point-to-point impulse response for the isotropic case using the two-dimensional wave equation, and utilizes a double integreal reduction technique to determine the tap-to-tap response, thereby significantly reducing the complexity of the calculations involved. An extension is then made to describe the impulse response of two cascaded transducers of arbitrary geometry, along with some simplifying cases. Previous attempts to m:x:lel diffraction effects generally utilized either the Fresnel Integral or the ANgular Spectrum of Plane Waves approach. The Fresnel Integral technique is inherently adequate to describe diffraction effects accurately only for the narrowband case, while the Angular Spectrum of Plane Waves requires an integration over frequency if the broadband case is to be considered. The approach presented in this thesis provides an impulse response which is valid over a wide range of frequencies, which allows for an accurate description of diffraction effects for the broadband case. The isotropic impulse response is used as an approximation to the anisotropic response, taking into account the variation of surface wave speed and coupling coefficient with propagation direction.

Graduation Date

1988

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Malocha, Donald

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Department

Electrical Engineering and Communication Sciences

Format

PDF

Pages

158 P.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022067

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering; Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic

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