Title

Self-esteem level, workload factors and selected demographic variables in nurse faculty

Abstract

This study was designed to examine the relationship among self-esteem levels, workload factors, and selected demographic variables of nurse educators. Different types of public nurse education programs in Florida were used. Data were obtained through a mailed questionnaire incorporating the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Hudson Index of Self-Esteem, workload and demographic items. Questionnaires were returned by 384 respondents of the 698 mailed for a 55% return rate.

High self-esteem scores for faculty from all types of nursing programs were found with both the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale(~= 35) and Hudson Index of Self-Esteem(~= 19). Statistically significant differences were determined between self-esteem scores of faculty according to initial nursing education. - Faculty with initial nursing education from diploma, associate degree and baccalaureate degree programs reported higher self-esteem levels than those with initial nursing education at a vocational or master's program. Statistically significant differences in percentage of total hours per week spent by faculty in teaching, research and scholarly activity, service and consultation were determined between the different types of programs but not in relation to self-esteem. Statistically significant differences were determined between self-esteem and salary but not in relation to program type in which respondents teach. Statistically significant negative correlations were found between self-esteem scores on the ISE and years of teaching (E = -0.22). A statistically significant negative correlation (E = -.62, p = .0001) was found between the two self-esteem instruments. Demographic findings indicated that 94.4% of faculty were full-time. Seventy-one percent of faculty were tenured or its equivalent. It was concluded that self esteem of nurse faculty in this study is high and does not vary regardless of the type program at which the person is teaching. Self esteem level may vary in faculty according to initial nursing education but differences are not evident when weekly percentage of time spent in teaching, research and scholarly activity, service and consultation are considered. Finally, self-esteem does not vary significantly among faculty according to program at which they teach, although there are significant differences in the types of workload activities according to type program.

Notes

This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by downloading and filling out the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement. You may also contact the project coordinator Kerri Bottorff for more information.

Graduation Date

1988

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Hudson, Larry

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Services

Format

Print

Pages

154 p.

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022743

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Education; Education -- Dissertations, Academic

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS