Keywords

Teacher orientation -- Florida, Teachers -- Training of -- Florida

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine whether there were significant factors contributing to a teacher's ability to perform effectively in the classroom. An approximate 5% stratified random sample was selected from 9,401 possible subjects in Florida's Beginning Teacher Program between 1982 and 1985. A comparison of descriptive and reportive data was performed for teachers who completed and teachers who did not complete the program.

Statistical measures included the use of contingency tables, chi-square statistic, frequency distributions and t-tests. Results suggested that a teacher's possibility of successfully completing Florida's Beginning Teacher Program was influenced by the participant's age, grade point average, type of university, college of education background, student teaching experience and teaching field. Of the teachers surveyed, those teachers who completed the Beginning Teacher Program reported significantly higher levels of performance in competencies dealing with discipline and motivation. All teachers cited peer teachers and coaching as the most common methods of assistance. Teachers who did not complete the program were more likely to lack student teaching and education background, to teach in critical shortage areas and to receive more assistance from principals than more successful teachers.

Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Olson, Arthur H.

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Services

Degree Program

Administration and Supervision

Format

PDF

Pages

207 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0022599

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