Keywords

Anxiety, Nightmares, Relaxation--Technique, Sleep disorders

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of progressive muscle relatxation on the frequency of, and the anxiety associated with, chronic nightmares. Three females diagnosed as suffering from an anxiety disorder and who experienced at least two nightmares per week served as subjects. Treatments consisted of practicing progressive relaxation trainig twice daily with the assistance of a tape-recorded exercise. The first practice occurred prior to 3:00 p.m. and the second practice occurred before retiring at night. Subjects recorded nightmare frequency, intensity, and theme on the Daily Nightmare Questionnaire (DNQ). In addition, nightmare-associated anxiety was measured daily with the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Both DNQ and STAI data were collected daily via the telephone. The study utilized a multiple baseline strategy across subjects, and all subjects showed a decline in both nightmare frequency and state and trait anxiety levels. A mean reduction of .96 nightmares per week resulted. This study demonstrated that a basic relaxation exercise, which does not address possible intrapsychic variables, was effective in nightmare reduction through a reduction in levels of anxiety.

Graduation Date

1987

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Jensen, Bernard J.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

33 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0023920

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