Keywords

binge eating, eating expectancies, expectancy theory, obesity

Abstract

The central aim of the present study was to examine the role of expectancies in binge eating behavior. Two distinct statistical techniques were used to accomplish this goal. First, regression analyses were conducted using variables previously identified in the literature, as well as eating expectancies as measured by the Eating Expectancy Inventory (EEI). For both females and males, regression equations including expectancies accounted for a substantial portion of the variance in binge eating behavior. Second, memory modeling techniques were used to model the probable organization of eating expectancies. Memory modeling of hypothetical expectancy networks has lead to successful interventions in alcohol use, and preliminary work in eating revealed a fundamental difference in the way that individuals with high levels of pathology activate and store eating related messages. In the present study, Individual Differences Scaling was used to model the two-dimensional organization of an eating expectancy memory network in relation to binge eating. INDSCAL weights indicated that participants with higher levels of binge eating placed more emphasis on the positive-negative dimension, and examination of group means revealed that high binge eaters expected more change in mood in response to eating. All findings are discussed in terms of implications for enhancing assessment, treatment, and prevention strategies.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Tantleff Dunn, Stacey

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001338

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001338

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Psychology Commons

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