Abstract

Situational Judgment Tests (SJTs) are frequently used by organizations as a face-valid selection measure with low adverse impact and a relatively strong relationship with relevant criteria. Despite their common use, there remain several research questions regarding the theoretical foundations and characteristics of SJTs. Additionally, developments in SJT scoring provide fertile ground for research to validate new scoring techniques to better predict criteria of interest. Motowidlo and his colleagues (2006) recently developed a scoring technique for SJTs based on the principle of Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs) which are implicit beliefs concerning the effectiveness of different behavioral choices that demonstrate varying levels of targeted traits. Individuals high in these targeted traits will rate item responses that demonstrate high levels of that particular trait as more effective. Taking into consideration this new method, and also considering the multitude of scoring methods already available to test developers, it logically follows that these different scoring methods will have different correlations with constructs of interest, and that by using this new method it may be possible to achieve a much higher correlation with personality. The effects of scoring technique on relationships between SJT scores and constructs of interest such as personality will in turn have effects on the criterion validity of the SJT. This research explored how scoring methods affected the relationship SJT scores have with general mental ability, personality traits, typical performance, and maximum performance. Results indicated significant differential validity as a function of the respondents‟ race. For minority participants, SJT scores predicted “maximum performance ratings” in a simulation exercise but not “typical performance ratings” provided by familiar peers. However, the reverse was true for Caucasian participants. The two scoring methods demonstrated differential validity. However, the nature of these differences varied as a function of the iv performance dimension in question (i.e., agreeableness, extraversion). Implications for future research will be discussed as well as the practical implications of these findings.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2011

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Jentsch, Kimberly

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Industrial and Organizational Psycholog Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004484

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004484

Language

English

Release Date

June 2012

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences, Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Share

COinS