Keywords

Calibration, microwave, radiometer, sac d, mwr, brightness temperature

Abstract

The Aquarius/SAC-D joint international science mission, between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of United States and the Argentine Space Agency (Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE), was launched on a polarorbiting satellite on June 10, 2011. This mission of discovery will provide measurements of the global sea surface salinity, which contributes to understanding climatic changes in the global water cycle and how these variations influence the general ocean circulation. The Microwave Radiometer (MWR), a three channel Dicke radiometer operating at 23.8 GHz H-Pol and 36.5 GHz V-& H-Pol provided by CONAE, will complement Aquarius (NASA’s L-band radiometer/scatterometer) by providing simultaneous spatially collocated environmental measurements such as water vapor, cloud liquid water, surface wind speed, rain rate and sea ice concentration. This dissertation focuses on the overall radiometric calibration of MWR instrument. Which means establishing a transfer function that relates the instrument output to the antenna brightness temperature (Tb). To achieve this goal, the dissertation describes a microwave radiative transfer model of the instrument and validates it using the laboratory and thermal-vacuum test data. This involves estimation of the losses and physical temperature profile in the path from the receiver to each antenna feed-horn for all the receivers. As the pre-launch laboratory tests can only provide a simulated environment which is very different from the operational environment in space, an on-orbit calibration of the instrument is very important. Inter-satellite radiometric cross-calibration of MWR using the Naval Research iii Laboratory’s multi-frequency polarimetric microwave radiometer, WindSat, on board the Coriolis satellite is also an important part of this dissertation. Cross-calibration between two different satellite instruments require normalization of Tb’s to account for the frequency and incidence angle difference between the instruments. Also inter-satellite calibration helps to determine accurate antenna pattern correction coefficients and other small instrument biases.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Jones, W

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004200

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004200

Language

English

Release Date

May 2012

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

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