Keywords

magnetic nanoparticles, AFM, SET, single-molecule magnet, molecular magnet

Abstract

In this thesis I am presenting a detailed study to optimize the deposition of magnetic molecules and gold nanoparticles in atomically flat surfaces by self-assembling them from solution. Epitaxially grown and atomically flat gold surface on mica is used as substrate for this study. These surfaces have roughness of the order one tenth of a nanometer and are perfect to image molecules and nanoparticles in the 1-10 nanometers range. The purpose of these studies is to find the suitable parameters and conditions necessary to deposit a monolayer of nano-substance on chips containing gold nanowires which will eventually be used to form single electron transistors by electromigration breaking of the nanowire. Maximization of the covered surface area is crucial to optimize the yield of finding a molecule/nanoparticle near the gap formed in the nanowire after electromigration breaking. Coverage of the surface by molecules/nanoparticles mainly depends on the deposition time and concentration of the solution used for the self-assembly. Deposition of the samples under study was done for different solution concentrations and deposition times until a self-assembly monolayer covering most of the surface area is obtained. Imaging of the surfaces after deposition was done by tapping-mode AFM. Analysis of the AFM images was performed and deposition parameters (i.e. coverage or molecule/particle size distribution) were obtained. The subjects of this investigation were a molecular polyoxometalate, a single-molecule magnet and functionalized gold nanoparticles. The obtained results agree with the structure of each of the studied systems. Using the optimized deposition parameters found in this investigation, single-electron transport measurements have been carried out. Preliminary results indicate the right choice of the deposition parameters.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

del Barco, Enrique

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002338

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002338

Language

English

Release Date

August 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Physics Commons

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