Abstract

Multitasking-based failures of perception and action are the focus of much research in driving, where they are attributed to distraction. Similar failures occur in contexts where the construct of distraction is little used. Such narrow application was attributed to methodology which cannot precisely account for experimental variables in time and space, limiting distraction's conceptual portability to other contexts. An approach based upon vigilance methodology was forwarded as a solution, and highlighted a fundamental human performance question: Would increasing the signal probability (SP) of a secondary task increase associated performance, as is seen in the prevalence effect associated with vigilance tasks? Would it reduce associated performance, as is seen in driving distraction tasks? A series of experiments weighed these competing assumptions. In the first, a psychophysical task, analysis of accuracy and response data revealed an interaction between the number of concurrent tasks and SP of presented targets. The question was further tested in the applied contexts of driving, cyberattack and battlefield target decision-making. In line with previous prevalence effect inquiry, presentation of stimuli at higher SP led to higher accuracy. In line with existing distraction work, performance of higher numbers of concurrent tasks tended to elicit slower response times. In all experiments raising either number of concurrent tasks or SP of targets resulted in greater subjective workload, as measured by the NASA TLX, even when accompanied by improved accuracy. It would seem that "distraction" in previous experiments has been an aggregate effect including both delayed response time and prevalence-based accuracy effects. These findings support the view that superior experimental control of SP reveals nomothetic patterns of performance that allow better understanding and wider application of the distraction construct both within and in diverse contexts beyond driving.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Hancock, Peter

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Human Factors Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006388

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006388

Language

English

Release Date

June 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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