Abstract

Women with military experience are attending colleges and universities across the United States. It is important to understand how they describe their experiences as students and how their help-seeking behaviors impact their success (DiRamio & Jarvis, 2011; Baechtold & Da Sawal, 2009). Using Schlossberg's Adult Transition Theory (1981, 1984) as a framework, this qualitative phenomenological study explored the help-seeking behaviors of women student veterans. In addition, the events that caused them to seek help and the resources they utilized are described. The research questions were: (1) Does the prior military experience of women student veterans influence their willingness to seek help? (2) What are the events that cause women student veterans to seek help? And (3) What are the resources that women student veterans utilize? Using Smith, Flowers and Larkin's (2009) Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), this two-phase mixed method design employed a sequential descriptive strategy employing a profile questionnaire and individual semi-structured interviews (N=9). The research identified six themes using Schlossberg's framework (1981, 1984). These six themes were: military influence, transitions, times of distress, tailored support, traditional support and support 'from my own'. The findings of this study provide researchers, student personnel professionals, and military educational constituencies with a foundation for policy and programming that account for the help seeking behaviors women student veterans' exhibit as they transition from the military to college.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Cox, Dr. Thomas

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Child, Family, and Community Sciences

Degree Program

Educational Leadership; Higher Education EdD Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006560

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006560

Language

English

Release Date

May 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Share

COinS