Abstract

Students with disabilities are included into general education classrooms to receive instruction with increasing frequency. To facilitate this inclusion, co-teaching is frequently used as a service delivery model (Friend, 2016; Murawski & Bernhardt, 2016). Co-teaching is a service delivery model where a general and special education teacher work in a collaborative environment to instruct students with and without disabilities (Friend, 2007, 2016). In using this approach, teachers are not always provided with the professional development (PD) necessary to effectively facilitate the co-teaching partnership. In this study, the researcher conducted a quasi-experimental study to examine the effects of a 10-minute online coaching PD intervention on student achievement, co-teachers' use of different models of co-teaching, and opportunities to respond in secondary math classes. The researcher observed 30 minutes of instruction in co-taught and solo-taught classes at the beginning and the end of the intervention. The results indicated a change from pre- to post-observation of students being more engaged, student talk increasing, and teachers using multiple models of co-teaching. Additionally, the researcher collected student growth scores for both solo and co-taught classes. The results of the analysis indicated students' scores improved significantly in the co-taught compared to the solo-taught classes after the coaching intervention. The researcher discusses the findings, implications, and best practices for use with secondary co-teaching teams.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Dieker, Lisa

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Degree Program

Education; Exceptional Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006745

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006745

Language

English

Release Date

August 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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