Abstract

Early alert systems have been recognized as a high impact practice designed to improve student engagement and student success. Early alert is designed to identify students with at-risk behaviors early in the semester before they decide to drop-out, withdraw, or fail their classes, using resources such as a predictive analysis tool or advising. For an early alert to be successful and efficient, faculty should be included in the process of early alert. This qualitative study examined faculty's perspective and experiences when implementing early alert strategies and intervention in a two-year institution. Using Cranton's seven facets of transformative learning as a conceptual framework, this study examined the changes, perception, and experiences of faculty as a result of implementation. The literature reviews best practices that can be considered when faculty designs their early alert strategies and intervention. Participants shared their During and After Implementation Journal experience by completing reflection journals. After careful analysis of their journals and initial interview, the following major themes emerged: a) at-risk behaviors, b) high-impact practices, c) intentionality, d) personal connection, e) perspective transformation, and f) value. As a result of these themes, recommendations were provided to assist faculty development and change agents in two-year institutions in improving early alert methods to increase student success.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Fall

Advisor

King, Kathy (Kathleen)

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Child, Family, and Community Sciences

Degree Program

Educational Leadership; Higher Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006857

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006857

Language

English

Release Date

12-15-2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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