Keywords

Caregivers in Kenya, caregivers in Africa, female caregivers, caregiver burden, coping responses, HIV/AIDS in Kenya, caregivers for persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), hope for caregivers, caregiver burden among caregivers in Kenya

Abstract

Caring for a family member who is ill can be a draining experience (Cooper et al., 2006; Daire, 2002; Zarit et al, 1980). Providing care for a family member that is living with HIV/AIDS is potentially even more stressful because of social meanings associated with HIV/AIDS infection (Stajduhar, 1998) and the contagious nature of the HIV virus (Powell-Cope & Brown, 1992). Research indicates that most caregivers are female (Bunting, 2001; Songwathana, 2000). In Africa women bear the brunt of the burden of providing care for family members who are living with HIV/AIDS (Mushonga, 2001; Olenja, 1999). This study examined coping factors and caregiver burden among female caregivers (N=116) of a family member living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya. Coping factors were derived from a principal components factor analysis of the fourteen scales on the Brief Cope (Carver, 1997). Caregiver burden was measured using the Zarit Caregiver Burden Inventory. Multiple regression analysis was used to investigate the relationships between caregiver burden and coping factors. Post–hoc multiple regression analyses further investigated the relationship between caregiver burden and caregiver demographic characteristics. The relationship between caregiver burden and care recipient characteristics was also investigated. The principle components factor analysis of the Brief Cope yielded five coping factors that were labeled: Social support, Hope, Acceptance, Planning, and Disposition. The regression analysis that was conducted to investigate the relationships between these five coping factors and caregiver burden indicated a significant inverse relationship between Hope and caregiver burden. The post-hoc analyses investigating the relationship between various caregiver and care recipient characteristics indicated a significant relationship between the caregiver's age and caregiver burden, and education level and caregiver burden. An increase in age correlated with a decrease in caregiver burden. An increase in education level correlated with reduced caregiver burden. Implications of the findings for research and practice are discussed.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Daire, Andrew

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Child, Family and Community Sciences

Degree Program

Counselor Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001012

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001012

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Share

COinS