Keywords

millennial generation, generation Y, online learning, Long reactive behavior patterns, higher education

Abstract

The goal of this study was to identify patterns or characteristics unique to online millennial students in higher education from two perspectives: the generational traits for an understanding of millennial students as a cohort, and the Long reactive behavior patterns and traits for an understanding of millennials as individuals. Based on the identified patterns and characteristics of these millennial students, the researcher highlighted instructional and curricular implications for online learning. A profile depicting online millennial students based on the demographic data and their overall satisfaction levels with online learning is provided. For a holistic understanding, the study included an inquiry into measures of independence between overall satisfaction with online learning, reactive behavior patterns and traits among participating millennials, and an account of what millennial students are saying about quality, preferences, and aversions in their online learning experience. Overall, the great majority, especially aggressive dependent and compulsive millennial students were satisfied with their online learning experience. Also, more female millennial students were satisfied with their experience compared to male millennial students. The role of the instructor, course design, and learning matters were the themes most frequently mentioned by millennial students when asked about the quality of online learning. Overwhelmingly, convenience, time management, flexibility, and pace were the aspects these millennial students liked most about their online encounter. On the contrary, lack of interaction, instructor's role, course design, and technology matters were the most frequent themes regarding millennials' dislikes about their online learning experience. Finally, the study includes recommendations for future research.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Dziuban, Charles

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Research, Technology and Leadership

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000968

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000968

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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