Abstract

Electronic cigarette usage is becoming increasingly prevalent among school age children and young adults. A known bactericidal agent, propylene glycol, is often used as a carrier for nicotine, flavoring, and additional constituents of electronic cigarette juice. This study examined the relationship between propylene glycol and virulence gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes, a respiratory tract pathogen commonly found in school-age individuals. A variety of virulence genes controlled by the three stand alone regulators mga, RofA, and Rgg/RopB were sampled in an effort to understand the pathway by which virulence is affected. The genes chosen encode C5a peptidase, fibronectin binding protein, hyaluronate lyase, NAD glycohydrolase, Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A and B, streptodornase, streptokinase, Streptolysin O, and Streptolysin S. No significant change in gene expression was observed, but a novel method to test the effects of aerosols on cells was developed. This method can be used in the future to observe the effect of aerosols, including commercial electronic cigarette juice, on both bacterial and mammalian cells.

Thesis Completion

2016

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Hoffman, Eric

Co-Chair

Moore, Sean D.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Biology

Degree Program

Biology

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Release Date

November 2019

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