Abstract

The thesis seeks to explore the didactic application of French science-fiction during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries for the portrayal and dissemination of their respective philosophical theories. Studying science-fiction novels during these centuries will allow a comparison of seventeenth and eighteenth-century dissemination methods, to determine if the foundational seventeenth-century methods were retained or modified to more accurately represent the change in philosophical attitudes. Exploration of this topic will contribute to a greater understanding of French Enlightenment theory, analysis of relatively unstudied novels in the science-fiction genre, and a novel approach to “proto” science-fiction literature by connecting the previously separate genres of science-fiction and philosophy during the Enlightenment. The trends within the seventeenth century show dominant authoritative representations through analogical examples, authoritative ideological figures, and an emphasis on logically sustained arguments. The eighteenth-century trends focus on logical passionate attitudes, burlesque scenarios, and authoritative actions to exemplify the Enlightenment ideologies. Therefore, these five analyzed œuvres show conservation of didactic and authoritative dissemination methods during this philosophically evolutionary time period.

Thesis Completion

2016

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Trinquet du Lys, Charlotte

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Modern Languages and Literature

Degree Program

French

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

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