Abstract

In the aftermath of World War II, the Liberal Democratic Party of Japan followed Germany’s blueprint in fashioning a universal health coverage system. Comparisons to Germany’s welfare state during this same time period reveal markedly different social and mental health policy practices, as Germany’s Christian Democratic Union and Social Democratic Party cooperated toward progressive policies while the Liberal Democratic Party largely neglected social welfare expansion. The effect of these practices is reflected in budgetary provisions, institutionalization practices, and mental health epidemiology. This research finds that a favorable economic climate allowed the Liberal Democratic Party to politically isolate the Social Democratic Party and focus on economic productivity as opposed to welfare expansion. In contrast, West Germany’s competition with East Germany forced cooperation of its two largest political parties to balance economic policy and social progress, which is today reflected in mental health outcomes and policies markedly more favorable than those of Japan.

Thesis Completion

2016

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Turcu, Anca

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Political Science

Degree Program

International and Global Studies

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

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