Abstract

The presence of siblings during childhood and adolescence has a significant impact on the behaviors and perceptions of adults later in life. Effects of mixed-gendered sibling dyads on delinquent behavior, gender typing, and romantic and sexual relationships are of interest. These behaviors can lead to notable health disparities, making it imperative to gain insight into factors associated with such behaviors in young adult and adolescent males. This project explored possible correlations between gender composition of siblings and health behavior indicators for violence, competition and risk, and sexual and romantic relationships. Analysis of these variables was performed using data from the Young Adult and Adolescent Male Health Behavior Indicator Scale [YAAMHBIS]. Descriptive analyses showed YAAM understanding of abuse and successful marriage and relationship qualities, as well as a conditional acceptance of violence, competition, and risk. Means testing between those with and without sisters indicated that those with sisters acknowledged abuse, marriage qualities, and the consequences of infidelity. Additionally, those with sisters had, on average, an earlier age of sexual debut than those without supporting previous research regarding the effects of female communication in childhood on adult interactions. The correlations found between sibling gender and YAAM perceptions later in life could lay the groundwork for future studies further investigating sibling gender or split households and an association with health behaviors.

Thesis Completion

2018

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Rovito, Michael J.

Co-Chair

Jasinski, Jana

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Health Professions

Degree Program

Health Sciences

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2018

Share

COinS