Keywords

Body language, Confidential communications, Reliability, Self disclosure, Therapist and patient

Abstract

This study attempted to clarify to what degree assurances of confidentiality and interviewer behavior protective of confidentiality impacted an interviewee’s trust of an interviewer and subsequent willingness to self-disclose. Ninety-six undergraduates were asked interview questions. Male and female subjects were divided into four conditions: confidentiality statement/protective behavior, confidentiality statement/nonprotective behavior, neutral statement/protective behavior, and neutral statement/nonprotective behavior. The Intended Self-Disclosure Questionnaire and Counselor Rating Form were used to measure self-disclosure and trustworthiness levels. Results did not support the main hypothesis that protective behavior would have a more significant impact on self-disclosure and trustworthiness than verbal assurances of confidentiality. However, assurances of confidentiality did lead to significantly higher trust levels. Responses to a post-questionnaire revealed over reporting of confidentiality instructions. Implications for therapy and future research are discussed.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

1985

Semester

Summer

Advisor

McGuire, John M.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0017162

Share

COinS