Keywords

Action potential; cellular metabolism; ng108-15 cells; electrophysiology

Abstract

The single largest cause of compound attrition during drug development is due to inadequate tools capable of predicting and identifying protein interactions. Several tools have been developed to explore how a compound interferes with specific pathways. However, these tools lack the potential to chronically monitor the time dependent temporal changes in complex biochemical networks, thus limiting our ability to identify possible secondary signaling pathways that could lead to potential toxicity. To overcome this, we have developed an in silico neuronal-metabolic model by coupling the membrane electrical activity to intracellular biochemical pathways that would enable us to perform non-invasive temporal proteomics. This model is capable of predicting and correlating the changes in cellular signaling, metabolic networks and action potential responses to metabolic perturbation. The neuronal-metabolic model was experimentally validated by performing biochemical and electrophysiological measurements on NG108-15 cells followed by testing its prediction capabilities for pathway analysis. The model accurately predicted the changes in neuronal action potentials and the changes in intracellular biochemical pathways when exposed to metabolic perturbations. NG108-15 cells showed a large effect upon exposure to 2DG compared to cyanide and malonate as these cells have elevated glycolysis. A combinational treatment of 2DG, cyanide and malonate had a much higher and faster effect on the cells. A time-dependent change in neuronal action potentials occurred based on the inhibited pathway. We conclude that the experimentally validated in silico model accurately predicts the changes in neuronal action potential shapes and proteins activities to perturbations, and would be a powerful tool for performing proteomics facilitating drug discovery by using action potential peak shape analysis to determine pathway perturbation from an administered compound.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Hickman, James

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Chemistry

Degree Program

Chemistry

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005822

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005822

Language

English

Release Date

June 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences; Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until June 2016; it will then be open access.

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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