Keywords

Nurse managers, workplace bullying, leadership styles, job demand

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to explore relationships between authentic leadership style, global social power, job demand, job control, and workplace bullying of nurse managers in acute care settings across the United States. Over 30 years of workplace bullying research exists. Consequences are linked to intent to leave, turnover, and harmful emotional and physical effects. Published studies identifying nurse managers as targets of workplace bullying and work environment factors that contribute to nurse managers being recipients of workplace bullying either, downward from their leaders, horizontally from their nurse manager peers, and upwards from their clinical nurses were not identified. A descriptive, cross-sectional design using an online survey was utilized. Descriptive, inferential, and multivariate analyses were used to identify relationships and the likelihood of workplace bullying occurring. Thirty-five percent (n = 80) of nurse managers reported being a target of workplace bullying. Managers sustained occasional (56%, n = 45) and severe (44%, n = 35) levels of workplace bullying, 65% (n = 43) identified their executive nurse leader as the predominate perpetrator. Authentic leadership, job demand, job control correlated significantly (p = < .01) with workplace bullying and job demand demonstrated the strongest likelihood (OR = 3.9) for predicting workplace bullying. Nurse Managers are four times more likely to be a recipient of workplace bullying when their job responsibilities are classified as demanding. This study expanded the science and demonstrated that nurse managers, the backbone of organizations, are recipients of workplace bullying emanating predominately from executive nurse leaders, but also from clinical nurses and their nurse manager peers. Given the harmful consequences of workplace bullying, as 'guardians' of and 'advocates' for their teams, executive nursing leaders, have an ethical and operational responsibility to ensure nurse managers are able to practice in a safe environment.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Andrews, Diane

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Degree Program

Nursing

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005986

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005986

Language

English

Release Date

December 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Nursing; Nursing -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2016; it will then be open access.

Included in

Nursing Commons

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