Keywords

Nano ergonomics, personal protective equipments, nanotechnology workers

Abstract

The National Science Foundation estimates that two million skilled nanotechnology workers will be needed world wide by 2015 – one million of them in the United States (2001). In the absence of scientific clarity about the potential health effects of occupational exposure to nanoparticles, guidance in decision making about hazards, risk, and controls takes on new importance. Currently, guiding principles on personal protective equipment for workers who come in contact with nanomaterials have not been standardized universally. Utilizing the NASATLX, this dissertation investigates the adequacy and shortcomings of research efforts that seek to determine whether or not occupational exposure to nanomaterials while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) is or is not potentially frustrating to the worker. While wearing PPE does the worker perceive additional effort, performance, physical, mental or temporal demands or are not impacted during task performance.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Mccauley Bush, Pamela

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Industrial Engineering and Management Systems

Degree Program

Industrial Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004497

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004497

Language

English

Release Date

November 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until November 2013; it will then be open access.

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