Keywords

Stress concentration factor, hill yield criterion, finite element modeling, woven wire mesh

Abstract

Woven structures are steadily emerging as excellent reinforcing components in dualphase composite materials subjected to multiaxial loads, thermal shock, and aggressive reactants in the environment. Metallic woven wire mesh materials display good ductility and relatively high specific strength and specific resilience. While use of this class of materials is rapidly expanding, significant gaps in mechanical behavior classification remain. This thesis works to address the mechanics of material knowledge gap that exists for characterizing the behavior of a metallic woven structure, composed of stainless steel wires on the order of 25 microns in diameter, and subjected to various loading conditions and stress risers. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile experiments, employing Digital Image Correlation (DIC) as a strain measurement tool, are conducted on woven wire mesh specimens incised in various material orientations, and with various notch geometries. Experimental results, supported by an ample analytic modeling effort, indicate that an orthotropic elastic constitutive model is reasonably capable of governing the macro-scale elasticity of the subject material. Also, the Stress Concentration Factor (SCF) associated with various notch geometries is documented experimentally and analytically, and it is shown that the degree of stress concentration is dependent on both notch and material orientation. The Finite Element Method (FEM) is employed on the macro-scale to expand the experimental test matrix, and to judge the effects of a homogenization assumption when modeling metallic woven structures. Additionally, plasticity of the stainless steel woven wire mesh is considered through experimental determination of the yield surface, and a thorough analytic modeling effort resulting in a modified form of the Hill yield criterion. Finally, mesoscale plasticity of the woven structure is considered, and the form of a multi-scale failure criterion is proposed and exercised numerically.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Gordon, Ali

Degree

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering; Mechanical Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004707

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004707

Language

English

Release Date

May 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2013; it will then be open access.

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