Keywords

DC to DC, forward resonant, soft switching, zero current switching

Abstract

In the field of power electronics there is always a push to create smaller and more efficient power conversion systems. This push is driven by the industry that uses the power systems, and can be realized by new semiconductor devices or new techniques. This examination describes a novel technique for a small and highly efficient method of converting relatively high DC voltage to a very low voltage for use in the telecommunications industry. A modification to the standard Forward Resonant converter results in improvements in component stress, system efficiency, response time, and control circuitry. This examination describes background information needed to understand the concepts in DC to DC power systems, "soft-switching" topologies, and control methods for these systems. The examination introduces several topologies that are currently being used, and several types that have been previously analyzed, as a starting point for the detailed analysis of the proposed converter topology. A detailed analytical analysis is given of the proposed topology, including secondary effects, and component stresses. This analysis is compared to the results found from both Pspice simulation, and a working DC to DC converter. Finally, the topology is examined for potential improvements, and possible refinements to the model described.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Batarseh, Issa

Degree

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001960

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001960

Language

English

Release Date

December 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2007; it will then be open access.

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