Keywords

Liquid Crystal, Response Time, Anchoring Energy, Pretilt Angle

Abstract

This dissertation covers some important topics on the liquid crystal-substrate surface effects, including theoretical derivations and confirming experimental results. The research work is expected to make important impacts on liquid crystal device designs and to open new doors for further research along these topics. In this dissertation, a novel high-electric-field technique is developed to characterize the anchoring energy of vertically-aligned liquid crystal cells. Both theoretical analyses and confirming experimental results are presented. Vertically-aligned liquid crystal cells with buffed polyimide alignment layers are used to validate the measurement techniques. Based on the voltage-dependent transmittance of the liquid crystal cells, a linear fitting can be obtained, which leads to a precise determination of the anchoring energy. If some specific liquid crystal material parameters are known, then the traditional cell capacitance measurements can be avoided. Anchoring energy and cell gap effects on liquid crystal response time is theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. A novel theory on the liquid crystal dynamics is developed. In this part, two different theoretical approaches are discussed: one is surface dynamic equation method and the other is effective cell gap method. These two different approaches lead to consistent results, which are also confirmed by our experimental results. This work opens a new door for LCD industry to optimize liquid crystal response time, and it is especially critical for liquid crystal cells with thin cell gap, which is a promising approach for fast response time liquid crystal display. Pretilt angle effects on liquid crystal dynamics are analyzed theoretically and validated experimentally. Analytical expressions are derived to describe liquid crystal response time under nonzero pretilt angle conditions. The theoretical analysis is confirmed experimentally using vertically-aligned liquid crystal cells. These results quantitatively correlate pretilt angles with liquid crystal response time, which is important for optimizing liquid crystal response time.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Wu, Shin-Tson

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001927

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001927

Language

English

Release Date

November 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until November 2007; it will then be open access.

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