Keywords

genetic programming, neural networks, evolutionary computation

Abstract

The evolution of explicitly represented topologies such as graphs involves devising methods for mutating, comparing and combining structures in meaningful ways and identifying and maintaining the necessary topological diversity. Research has been conducted in the area of the evolution of trees in genetic programming and of neural networks and some of these problems have been addressed independently by the different research communities. In the domain of neural networks, NEAT (Neuroevolution of Augmenting Topologies) has shown to be a successful method for evolving increasingly complex networks. This system's success is based on three interrelated elements: speciation, marking of historical information in topologies, and initializing search in a small structures search space. This provides the dynamics necessary for the exploration of diverse solution spaces at once and a way to discriminate between different structures. Although different representations have emerged in the area of genetic programming, the study of the tree representation has remained of interest in great part because of its mapping to programming languages and also because of the observed phenomenon of unnecessary code growth or bloat which hinders performance. The structural similarity between trees and neural networks poses an interesting question: Is it possible to apply the techniques from NEAT to the evolution of trees and if so, how does it affect performance and the dynamics of code growth? In this work we address these questions and present analogous techniques to those in NEAT for genetic programming.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Wu, Annie

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Computer Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001971

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001971

Language

English

Release Date

December 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2007; it will then be open access.

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