Keywords

genetic algorithm, variable length, random selection

Abstract

In this work, we show how a variable-length genetic algorithm naturally evolves populations whose mean chromosome length grows shorter over time. A reduction in chromosome length occurs when selection is absent from the GA. Specifically, we divide the mating space into five distinct areas and provide a probabilistic and empirical analysis of the ability of matings in each area to produce children whose size is shorter than the parent generation's average size. Diversity of size within a GA's population is shown to be a necessary condition for a reduction in mean chromosome length to take place. We show how a finite variable-length GA under random selection pressure uses 1) diversity of size within the population, 2) over-production of shorter than average individuals, and 3) the imperfect nature of random sampling during selection to naturally reduce the average size of individuals within a population from one generation to the next. In addition to our findings, this work provides GA researchers and practitioners with 1) a number of mathematical tools for analyzing possible size reductions for various matings and 2) new ideas to explore in the area of bloat control.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Wu, Annie

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Computer Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001652

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001652

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2007; it will then be open access.

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