Keywords

Immediate Feedback, Delayed Feedback, After Action Review, Intelligent Tutoring, Knowledge Acquisition Retention and Transfer

Abstract

An After Action Review (AAR) is the Army training system's performance feedback mechanism. The purpose of the AAR is to improve team (unit) and individual performance in order to increase organizational readiness. While a large body of knowledge exists that discusses instructional strategies, feedback and training systems, neither the AAR process nor the AAR systems have been examined in terms of learning effectiveness and efficiency for embedded trainers as part of a holistic training system. In this thesis, different feedback methods for embedded training are evaluated based on the timing and type of feedback used during and after training exercises. Those feedback methodologies include: providing Immediate Directive Feedback (IDF) only, the IDF Only feedback condition group; using Immediate Direct Feedback and delayed feedback with open ended prompts to elicit self-elaboration during the AAR, the IDF with AAR feedback condition group; and delaying feedback using opened ended prompts without any IDF, the AAR Only feedback condition group. The results of the experiment support the hypothesis that feedback timing and type do effect skill acquisition, retention and transfer in different ways. Immediate directive feedback has a significant effect in reducing the number of errors committed while acquiring new procedural skills during training. Delayed feedback, in the form of an AAR, has a significant effect on the acquisition, retention and transfer of higher order conceptual knowledge as well as procedural knowledge about a task. The combination of Immediate Directive Feedback with an After Action Review demonstrated the greatest degree of transfer on a transfer task.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2005

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Williams, Kent

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Industrial Engineering and Management Systems

Degree Program

Industrial Engineering and Management Systems

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000441

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000441

Language

English

Release Date

May 2005

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2005; it will then be open access.

Included in

Engineering Commons

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