Keywords

Michael Beaman, Manuel Puig, Kiss of the Spider Woman

Abstract

Identity, who we are, is at the core of every human being, thus at the core of every character from every play. How the character identifies his self through gender and sexual identity will shape both physical and emotional choices that an actor will make through the rehearsal process. As an actor, it is absolutely imperative to resist the urge to pass judgment on the characters we portray. As more characters in modern drama are openly gay, there is an increasing urge for an actor to fall into campy stereotypes. Through a performance of the role of Molina in Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, this thesis will examine the blurring line of gender identity of the leading man in contemporary drama and explore the challenges of portraying a feminine man in a non-stereotypical way, remaining true to the identification of the character. A thorough historical analysis presents a look at the evolution of the homosexual throughout modern drama, from self-loathing party boys of the seventies to ordinary fathers, husbands, and sons in modern households. A structural analysis of Puig's text will aid in the choices made by the actor. Lastly, a complete character analysis will examine the psychological motivations behind Molina's actions as well as the changes in his gender and sexual identity throughout the piece. This thesis will culminate in a comprehensive development, rehearsal and performance journal, which will document and address challenges, discoveries, failures and victories during the production process.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2009

Advisor

Weaver, Earl

Degree

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Theatre

Degree Program

Theatre

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002748

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002748

Language

English

Release Date

September 2009

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until September 2009; it will then be open access.

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